CEF Soldier Detail

Private Thomas W Smith
Died: October 15, 1917

Regimental Number:
415843
Survived War:
No
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
24th Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Baccaro, Shelburne County, Nova Scotia
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Susan Smith - mother Port Maitland, Yarmouth, N.S.
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
March 21, 1894
Trade or Calling:
fisherman
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
No
Place of Enlistment:
Aldershot, Nova Scotia
Date of Enlistment:
August 12, 1915
Age at enlistment:
21
Height:
5 Feet 4 Inches
Chest:
36 Inches
Expansion:
2 Inches
Religion:
Wesleyan
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Killed in Action
Battle Died/Wounded:
Mericourt near Passchendaele
Date of Death:
October 15, 1917
Age at Death:
23
Buried at:
La Targette British Cemetery, Neuville-St. Vaast, Pas de Calais, France
Plot:
I. G. 12.
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 1Box 9108 - 54
Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 24th Battalion
Private Canadian Infantry 40th Battalion D Company

Attested to 40th Battalion as shown on attestation papers

 Letter from Chaplin Capt. C. Stuart:

"But it was a splendid death and absolutely consistent with his whole life; he was binding up the wounds of two men in the trenches when a shell burst, killing them all three. One can only be thankful that death came so quickly and painlessly, and that he was spared all suffering."

Ref: Sarnia & Lambton County This Week Wed. Nov. 11,2009 page 19 - Family rediscovers the great uncle from the Great War

Letter from friend Willard Perry:

"He was killed last Monday morning about 5 o'clock. Old Fritz started an attack. It was an awful morning, the biggest bombardment I've gone through since I came over this last time. Tom was trying to dress a wounded man out in the trench and a shell landed right in on them. It was what we call a "whiz-bang". The fellow that Tom was dressing was blown nearly to pieces, but the only mark they could see on Tom was a piece in the chest. He died instantly so did not suffer. He was carried out and buried out of range of German shells."

 "Every spare minute we had to ourselves Tom & I were together and we always shared with each other. I had a box from home on Tuesday. I thought of Tom when I was opening it and I had to just sit down and cry.

God be with him till we meet again, is my prayer.

From Tom's old pal,

Willard Perry"

Seven other men apparently died that day with Smith at Mericourt.

Ref: Sarnia & Lambton County This Week Wed. Nov. 11,2009 page 19 & 24 - Family rediscovers the great uncle from the Great War