CEF Soldier Detail

Private George Robert Wellbelove
Died: April 25, 1915

Regimental Number:
13169
Survived War:
No
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
5th Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Clewer
Country:
Next of Kin:
Mrs. J. Watson, 7 Priory Street, Risca, Monmouthshire
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
September 21, 1893
Trade or Calling:
Farm Hand
Marital Status:
Single
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Valcartier, Quebec
Date of Enlistment:
September 21, 1914
Age at enlistment:
21
Height:
5 Feet 8 Inches
Chest:
35 Inches
Expansion:
3 Inches
Religion:
Church of England
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Killed in Action
Battle Died/Wounded:
Second Battle of Ypres, at Gravenstafel
Date of Death:
April 25, 1915
Age at Death:
21
Buried at:
Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium
Plot:
Panel 18 - 26 - 28
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 1Box 10216-14
Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Research Notes

Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial

War Diaries of 5th Battalion show he was killed in action at Gravenstafel.  Mention of his death on Page 163 of the book "Holding The Line" by Sergeant Harold Baldwin.
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 5th Battalion

Pte. George Robert Wellbelove was a home child brought over to the Barnardo Homes in Canada, and then sent to work with a family.  There is a large photo collection for Pte. George Wellbelove on his CVWM record.  The collection includes photos of Wellbelove as a child taken for Dr. Barnardo, photos of a young man, and photos in uniform.

Pte. Wellbelove was mentioned in a book written by Sgt. Harold Baldwin about the 5th Battalion entitled "Holding the Line".  His name appeared in the dedication, and on pages 162-3:

To the sorrow of every one of us, the gallant soul of Bill Skerry took its flight to his Maker about ten o'clock that morning.  A small shell ricochetting from a stunted willow tree simply tore him to pieces, along with a little chap named Wellbelove, which was his family name, and a name he most aptly deserved.