CEF Soldier Detail

Private George McLean DCM

Regimental Number:
688302
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
54th Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Kamloops, British Columbia
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Mrs. Margaret Boho, guardian of children, of Vernon, British Columbia
Address at Enlistment:
Douglas Lake, British Columbia
Date of Birth:
April 15, 1875
Trade or Calling:
Rancher
Marital Status:
Married
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Vernon, British Columbia
Date of Enlistment:
October 14, 1916
Age at enlistment:
41
Height:
5 Feet 7 Inches
Chest:
38 Inches
Expansion:
3 Inches
Religion:
Roman Catholic
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Date of Death:
Age at Death:
Buried at:
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 1Box 7039-33
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 54th Battalion
Private Canadian Infantry 172nd Battalion

Served in South African War with 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles for 6 months as Regimental no. 380 enlisting at Kamloops, British Columbia on April 24, 1902.

A report in the Vancouver Daily Sun on 07 October 1917, indicated that a party of returned veterans had arrived in Vancouver on the morning of Saturday October 6th.   Pte. McLean, DCM, was included in this party:

Captured Company Single Handed

The most interesting figure in the party in some ways is Pte. G. McLean, D.C.M., of the 54th Kootenay battalion, in which he enlisted at Kamloops.  He got his medal and made his name in military annals at Vimy Ridge, where he captured a large number of Germans single handed.  During the third day of the fighting one of the officers of Pte. McLean's section was wounded.  He carried him out of the melee and when he returned he foudn himself and a companion near a German dugout, containing about 60 men.

McLean was carrying a number of bombs.  Just as he was about to throw his first bomb his companion was killed by his side.  Then he started bombing in earnest.  Pretty soon the German sergeant-major came up shouting, "Do not throw the bomb."  McLean paused and the German asked how many there were in his party.  McLean answered that there were 150.  The German then handed over his automatic and called to his companions, who emerged with their hands up, and McLean marched them to the British lines under cover of the German automatic.

The officer of this party had lived in North Dakota for some time, hence his ability to speak English.  He said that he was in Germany on a visit when he was conscripted, and that he had no desire to fight.  Pte. McLean says, and in this he is borne out generally by his comrades, that they often come across Huns who are anxious to surrender.

Awards and Decorations
Distinguished Conduct Medal
TypeDateDescription
Newspaper Extract 10/7/1917 How Pte. George McLean, 54th Kootenay Battalion, won his D.C.M.