CEF Soldier Detail

Major-General David Watson
Died: February 19, 1922

Regimental Number:
NA
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
4th Division Headquarters
Company:
Place of Birth:
Quebec City, Quebec
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Mrs Mary Browning Watson (wife), Quebec City, Quebec
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
February 7, 1869
Trade or Calling:
Marital Status:
Married
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Date of Enlistment:
Age at enlistment:
Height:
Chest:
Expansion:
Religion:
Unknown
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Date of Death:
February 19, 1922
Age at Death:
53
Buried at:
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
Not Specified
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Not Specified
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 10132 - 13
Research Notes
2nd Battalion Nominal Roll
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Major-General Canadian Infantry 4th Division Headquarters

From the wikipedia entry

Sir David Watson (7 February 1869 – 19 February 1922) was a Canadian journalist, newspaper owner, and general.

Born in Quebec City, Quebec, the son of William Watson and Jane Grant, Watson was a journalist with the Quebec Morning Chronicle (later called just Quebec Chronicle). He later became general manager of the paper and general manager of its publisher.

He started his military career as a private in the 8th Regiment, Royal Rifles. He became an officer and was a lieutenant. He was promoted to captain in 1903, major in 1910, and lieutenant-colonel in 1912. In 1914, he enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and was soon given command of the 2nd Battalion, CEF. He was promoted to Brigadier in 1915 and took command of the 5th Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division. In 1916, he was promoted to Major-General and took command of the 4th Canadian Division. He fought in most of the major Canadian battles of World War I including Second Battle of Ypres, Battle of Vimy Ridge, Battle of Passchendaele, Battle of Amiens, Battle of Arras, and Battle of Cambrai.

After the war, he resumed his job at the Quebec Chronicle and became the majority owner. He was also chairman of the Quebec Harbour Commission. He died in 1922.

Listed on the Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion as its commanding officer.