CEF Soldier Detail

Private Richard Basil McPherson

Regimental Number:
76349
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
29th Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Country:
Canada
Next of Kin:
Mrs E. McPherson, 110 Bridge St., W. Belleville, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
Date of Birth:
July 20, 1888
Trade or Calling:
Salesman
Marital Status:
Not Specified
Prior Military Experience:
Yes
Place of Enlistment:
Vancouver, British Columbia
Date of Enlistment:
April 26, 1915
Age at enlistment:
26
Height:
Chest:
Expansion:
Religion:
Unknown
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Date of Death:
Age at Death:
Buried at:
Unknown
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
Not Specified
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Caucasian
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 1Box 7186-32
Research Notes

29th Battalion Nominal Rolls

Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 29th Battalion

Previous service - 88th Regiment.

* * * * * *

A soldier named "R. B. MacPherson", described as a "shoeman" (in the footwear industry), had a letter and poem published in a Canadian shoe industry magazine called "The Shoe and Leather Journal", 15 December 1915, pg 42 (link to digitized version of original).   Transcription of letter.

The soldier who wrote this letter appears to be Pte. Richard Basil McPherson of the 29th Battalion CEF.  A soldier named "R. B. McPherson" had written another letter which was published in the September 15th, 1915 edition of this shoe industry magazine and included his photograph in uniform.  McPherson was described as being in the 29th Battalion and training at Otterpool Camp, Shorncliffe, Kent, England. He had 12 years of experience in the shoe industry and had served with leading shoe firms in Victoria and Vancouver as a salesman and window dresser.  He had won several prizes in window trimming competitions.  He asked for "The Shoe and Leather Journal" magazine to be sent to the men overseas who were in the shoe trade in Canada.  He also wrote:  "We have had English army boots issued to us...They are very heavy, with plenty of nails and steel plates on the bottom and no give whatever, and are evidently made never to wear out."  

- M. I. Pirie, August 2017