CEF Soldier Detail

Private Tadashi (Tow) Inouye

Regimental Number:
688274
Survived War:
Yes
Force:
Army
Regiment:
Canadian Infantry
Battalion:
47th Battalion
Company:
Place of Birth:
Yokohama
Country:
Japan
Next of Kin:
Nikuma Inouye; wife; Kamloops, British Columbia
Address at Enlistment:
Kamloops, British Columbia
Date of Birth:
October 16, 1883
Trade or Calling:
Merchant
Marital Status:
Married
Prior Military Experience:
No
Place of Enlistment:
Kamloops, British Columbia
Date of Enlistment:
July 19, 1916
Age at enlistment:
32
Height:
5 Feet 2 Inches
Chest:
34 Inches
Expansion:
2 Inches
Religion:
Methodist
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Saw service in:
Europe    
Cause of Death:
Survived
Battle Died/Wounded:
Date of Death:
Age at Death:
Buried at:
Plot:
Commemorated:
 
Prisoner of war:
No
Interned:
Gender:
Male
Ethnic Origin:
Oriental
LAC Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1Box 1Box 4703 - 4
Research Notes

131st Battalion Nominal Roll

Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private Canadian Infantry 47th Battalion
Private Canadian Infantry 131st Battalion
Private Canadian Infantry 172nd Battalion

One who was a successful enlistee in a BC battalion was Tow Inouye. He was born in Yokahama in 1883, came to British Columbia in 1905 and had worked at The Arrow Lakes Lumber Company for 10 years. He enlisted with the 172nd Battalion at Vernon, British Columbia in 1916. He served overseas with the 47th Battalion and was awarded the Military Medal in September, 1918. He was severely wounded November 3, 1918.

Tadashi Inouye,  first attested to the 172nd Battalion and later served in the 131st Battalion and won the Military Medal. Returned to Canada after the war and became a naturalized citizen, died 1926.

His son was tried for war crimes for his actions while in the Japanses Army in WWII          Kanao Inouye, AKA the "Kamloops Kid" was the only son of Tow Inouye. Born about 1916, he was 10 when is father died in 1926 and was sent to live in Japan, but was returned to Canada shortly after. In 1935 he returned to Japan and by 1938 was serving in the Japanese army. He left Canada allegedly to escape the racism he endured in Canada, only to find rejection in Japan as foreign born. Even though he was bilingual he only rose to the rank of honourary Corporal, at which position he served at Sham Shui Poi Camp, Hong Kong as an interpretor. It was here that he dealt many cruelties to Canadian prisoners. Later in the war he joined the Kempe Tai(secret police) and was involved in the arrest and torture of many of Hong Kong's foreign residents.  At war's end he was brought before a War Crimes Tribunal, convicted and sentenced to death. His lawyer protested, noting that as a Canadian citizen, Inouye couldn't be tried for war crimes. A second trial was held in the Hong Kong Supreme Court, this time for treason where he was found guilty a second time and executed at Stanley Gaol, Hong Kong, Aug 27, 1947.  Inouye not only hurt Canadian soldiers by his actions, but also the Japanese-Canadian community in Canada, who had enough problems already with property seizures and internment.  

Awards and Decorations
Military Medal