Lieutenant William Eric Lockhart

Regimental Number:
184 - Officer
Survived War:
No
Force:
Air Force
Regiment:
Royal Flying Corps
Battalion:
100th Squadron
Company:
Enlisted or Conscripted:
Enlisted
Prior Military Experience:
No
Enlistment Date:
January 21, 1915
Age at Enlistment:
21
Enlisted at:
Ottawa, Ontario
Address at Enlistment:
Newcastle, Ontario
Civilian Occupation:
Civil Engineer
Saw Service in:
Europe
Date of Death:
June 12, 1917
Age at Death:
24
Cause of Death:
Killed in Action
Battle Died/Wounded:
Burial:
Aire Communal Cemetery, France
Plot:
I. H. 10.
Commemorated:
 
Date of Birth:
March 8, 1893
Next of Kin:
Mrs. W. T. Lockhart - Mother
Place of Birth:
Newcastle, Ontario
Country of Birth:
Canada
Prisoner of War:
No
Interned:
Married:
Single
Religion:
Presbyterian
Height:
5 Feet 10 Inches
Chest:
36.5 Inches
Expansion:
4.5 Inches
Ethnic Origin:
Not Specified
   
NAC Reference: ^1Box 1Box 5706 - 2
Rank Regiment Unit Company
Private
Canadian Engineers
2nd Divisional Signals Company
Lieutenant
Canadian Engineers
Canadian Engineers
Lieutenant
Royal Flying Corps
100th Squadron
Awards and Decorations
Notes
Research Notes

Promoted through ranks.

2nd Canadian Divisional Signal Coy - War Diary Entry:

1915-12-29 - Page 15 - No 184 Pte. Lockhart W. E. (CAMC) struck off strength 17-12-15

From the “University of Toronto / Roll of Service 1914-1918”, published 1921

WILLIAM ERIC LOCKHART  Mar. 8, 1893 – June 12, 1917

                Lieutenant, Canadian Engineers, Signals, and Royal Flying Corps. Son of the late W. T. Lockhard, M.P.P.; b. Newcastle; ed. Newcastle P.S. and H.S.,Bowmanville H.S.; Applied Science 1911-15, B.A.SC. (Civ. Eng.); Psi Delta Psi.                

In November 1914 he enlisted in the 2nd Divisional Signal Company of the Canadian Engineer, In which he was later promoted Sergeant, and went overseas in May 1915.  He went to France with this unit in September, and served at the front, mostly in the Ypres area, till December when he was invalided with pleurisy and remained in England for several months.  In February1917 he received his commission in the Engineers, and shortly afterwards was seconded to the R.Flying Corps.  He returned to France on June 2nd, being appointed to the 100th Squadron, and beganNight flying over the lines.  Ten days later, when he was acting as machine-gunner, the plane fellJust before crossing the enemy’s lines, killing him instantly.  Buried at Aire new St. Omer.                  

Details of death from Ancestry.com which includes a digitized image of the casualty form from the "Canada, War Graves Registers (Circumstances of Casualty), 1914-1948" database. Note this only states he was Killed in Action with no other details.